Ahmed Elgazzar (KT Done)

Ahmed Elgazzar (KT Done)


Hey guys. My name is Ahmed Elgazzar and the title of my project is ‘the effects of simulated space flight conditions on
the myometrium uterus.’ This project was done under the Department of Health Sciences in the College of Public Health. It was also collaborative project with Loma Linda University in Loma Linda,
California. Now let’s talk in hypotheticals first. Let’s say that
business ventures such as Virgin Galactic and other services that provide
recreational space travel become more normal and accessible to people all over
the world. We need to be aware of the negative health consequences that we
could incur if we were to leave Earth’s atmosphere. Two of those forces, which is what we looked at in this project, is radiation and microgravity. Specifically,
we looked at the effects of radiation and microgravity and the combination of
those two forces on the health of the uterus. The uterus is very important in
the health of the zygotes once it’s implanted seeing it grow into a fetus
and aiding in its parturition or birth. The myometrium is the muscular
wall of the uterus which is what we specifically looked at as a part of the
uterus in this project. The mice that were used in this project were housed,
treated, and sacrificed all at Loma Linda University in California. The exposures
included isolated radiation treatments, isolated microgravity treatments, and
treatments that included both radiation in microgravity. The mice were exposed
for twenty-one days to those experimental conditions and they were
sacrificed at three different time points: one-month post exposure, four months post exposure, and nine months post exposure. At that point, that tissue samples were
sent to us and we analyzed them. For this specific project and for the sake of
time we looked at the four month post exposure mice. What we found was that
most of the musculature was unchanged between the control group and the
radiated unloaded and radiated and unloaded mice; however, we did find an
anomaly and the unloaded mice with regard to their outer longitudinal layer. Now this brings up another point: the uterus is made up of two muscular layers,
an outer longitudinal layer which runs the length of the uterus and an inner
circular layer which runs circumferentially. These muscles interact
to contract in separate directions to allow in childbirth and expansion during
pregnancy. Now, it might be a good thing that we
didn’t find many results but it’s also important to look at the different time
frames. So it’d be important to consider the mice that were exposed or sacrificed one
month post exposure and the mice that were sacrificed and nine months exposure to
assess any repairs or damages that might have occurred in that time. If there was
damage in the first month, did it heal itself by the fourth month that we
didn’t pick it up? Or, is there damage that’s going to be done between the
fourth and nine months that we need to see at the nine month interval? Those are
at those are questions to ask when we complete this project and its entirety.
Thank you.

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