Brielle Teaches Ellen About the Human Body

Brielle Teaches Ellen About the Human Body


Our next guest has dedicated her entire
life to studying the field of science and recently, she made the decision
to change her career path and dedicate her time to teaching
everyone about the human anatomy. Please welcome back our four year old
expert, Brielle, and her mom, Carry. You’re four years old now,
it was your birthday last time I saw you.>>Yes, it was.>>What did you get? I’ve got a game called Scrabble.>>Scrabble. Are you good at Scrabble?>>I’m still sounding out my words.>>Yes.
[LAUGH] That’s a wonderful gift to get Scrabble like that. And Valentines Day,
what’d you do for Valentines Day?>>Took my Valentine’s Day pictures and
also went to Build A Bear.>>Went to Build a Bear.>>Build a Bear. Did you build a bear?>>I put a sound and a smell in my bear.>>She put a sound and smell in her bear.>>What kind of sound?>>A bark.>>A bark, so
that it would bark like a dog?>>Yeah.>>That’s cute, it’s a barking doggy bear. Now you’re learning about, you know
everything about the periodic table, but now you’ve decided to learn
about the human body. I’m gonna bring Mr. Bones out and
we’re gonna go over here and I’m gonna ask you some questions because
this is relatively new, right, Carey?>>Yes.>>How long has Brielle been interested?>>This is Mr. Bones right here.>>Yes, that is Mr. Bones. I’m gonna give you a pointer.>>Thank you.
>>And I’m gonna ask you.>>Thank you.
>>There you go.>>She already knows it.>>This is my pointer.>>I’m gonna ask you to show
me where the clavicle is, and tell me about the clavicle.>>This helps me reach it.>>Okay.>>Because it’s bigger than me.>>Yes, it is bigger than you. Tell me about the clavicle.>>And it’s further than my arm. It’s the most common fractured
bone in the whole human body.>>Most commonly fractured
bone in the human body.>>Wow, okay. Where is the skull and
tell me about the skull.>>That’s the skull.>>Yep, that’s the skull.>>That’s the frontal and the parietal and
the temporal and the occipital.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>And the patella.>>It’s right there.>>Tell me about the patella.>>Babies are born without kneecaps. Isn’t that crazy?>>[LAUGH] It is crazy that
babies are born without kneecaps. When do they start getting kneecaps?>>They don’t show up until
they’re two to six years old. Babies are born with kneecaps but
they don’t show up very well on x-ray because they are not
which means hard bone.>>[LAUGH]
>>Okie dokie and then->>[LAUGH]>>Sometimes I go home and feel good about myself and
sometimes I don’t.>>[LAUGH]
>>Scapula, show me that.>>It’s behind Mr. Bones.>>And tell me about the scapula.>>It’s a Latin word that means blade.>>It’s a Latin word that means blade. Yeah.
>>Yeah. Instead of, yeah.>>Instead of shoulder scapula,
you can say shoulder blade.>>Yes, yes. And the sternum. Show me the sternum.>>It’s right here. This helps me touch the sternum. It protects several vital organs and
the heart.>>[LAUGH]
>>[APPLAUSE]>>All right.>>[APPLAUSE]
>>You are so impressive. I think that this is amazing. I don’t know what you’re gonna be
learning next time you’re here.

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