Foamrolling boosts muscle recovery – Adding most recent evidence to Jeff Nippard video

Foamrolling boosts muscle recovery – Adding most recent evidence to Jeff Nippard video


This video is to review the most recent scientific evidence on the effects of foamrolling we will go through three potential effects of foam rolling
3 potential theories behind it and three limitations of this study, and also I will finish with my opinion on it, so let’s have a look at their findings. This is the most recent systematic review with 21 studies included out of the 21 studies, 14 studies used pre rolling which means they used the foam roller before exercising. And the remaining 7 used post rolling which means after exercising. their conclusion is this. They said there is a short term effect of increasing joint range of motion without decreasing muscle performance, which is expected because your muscles get warmed up with foam rolling. That’s why you can move better secondly. They suggest the foam rolling before exercises may improve sports performance some studies found it was slightly effective for Elite sprinters, but not for jump or strength performance, however the effect size is so small with only 0.7% Improvement they also mentioned it may be just a psychological effect where the sprinters just felt better and more confident after foam rolling, although it can be just placebo effect psychological aspects play an important role in more sports. Especially at an elite level. So if you’re an elite sprinter you may consider foam rolling before sprinting. What’s more interesting is they found a positive effect of foam rolling on alleviating muscle soreness if it’s used after exercising according to this study 66% of the population is likely to experience reduced muscle pain by foam rolling after exercise so let’s have a look at how it works. The first potential theory behind it is scar tissue breaking down. You might have heard that there is some sort of knots or Scar tissue between muscle fibres and by foamrolling your muscles you can get rid of them. a lot of people assume that way, but unfortunately it’s an assumption only at this stage it maybe but so far there’s no scientific evidence on foam rolling breaking down the scar tissue Another explanation is that you could potentially warm up your muscles by moving your body during foam rolling your muscles have to activate to maintain these positions. Which induce pre-activation and warm up effects the last one is changes in pain perception, this is probably the most plausible explanation that the sensation of the pain during foam rolling overrides the actual pain signals induced by painful muscles or injuries Simply put, your trick your brain into paying more attention to the pain sensation from foamrolling rather than actual muscle pain or injury pain. Basically increasing pain threshold there are three limitations in this study firstly sample sizes and effect sizes are small which result in reduced statistical power second none of the included studies were able to blind their subject to the treatment that’s because of the nature of the foam-rolling technique. so if you were involved in one study about medication. You would take a pill without knowing what the Medication is about you may be given the actual medication that the researchers are testing or you maybe just given the vitamin or pain killer, but in this type of study, because of the nature of the foam rolling, all the subjects already knew they were going to do foam rolling and they would have expected something is going to get better which can impact on the result of the studies. This is a placebo effect. Also each study used different protocols and tools. We don’t know how much pressure each subject may have used some people might’ve applied light pressure while the others might’ve done harder, although there are more studies recommending firm foamrollers, so taken all together the physiological mechanisms of the potential benefits of foam rolling are not fully understood. It’s not the scar tissue breaking down as many people might have heard of or just assumed but I’d rather say it is the effects of the movements we make during foam rolling and the pain perception changes, this is why I show you the muscle release techniques before exercising in this channel pain control is an important part of any rehab, so I think massaging or foam-Rolling targeted muscles will help warm up those muscles. and potentially reduce the pain level and the best part is it is a safe way to do that, as there is almost no side effects reported in this study to sum up foam-rolling does not seem to improve muscle functions whether it’s used before or after exercises. However, there seems to be a positive effect on the alleviating muscle soreness. If it’s used after exercises, even though it can be just a psychological effect or simply changes in pain perception. Despite all this, I believe science can’t explain everything yet because it is almost impossible to do this kind of research in a good setting due to the nature of the foam. anyway based on what they’ve found so far, I definitely recommend foam rolling before exercising if you are in a rehab process because you need to reduce your pain perception before exercising. Otherwise you can’t do the exercises, right? And if you’re just a regular exerciser, from-rolling after exercise is recommended to reduce muscle soreness, there may be some potential effects that haven’t been found out therefore, my personal opinion is to do this kind of of muslce release as often as possible because there is no harm anyway, unless you do too hard. In fact, I do that all the time because it just feels good doing that. I’ll see you next time. Cheers

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