Going Out on a Limb The Anatomy of the Upper Arm with James S White

Going Out on a Limb The Anatomy of the Upper Arm with James S White


Hello, I’m Dr. Jim White. I’m an Adjunct Assistant Professor of Cell and Developmental Biology in the Perelman School of Medicine at the
University of Pennsylvania, and I teach first-year medical students anatomy and have done so
here for 20 years. Our course, Going Out on a Limb, The Anatomy of the Upper Limb, will
deal with the musculoskeletal anatomy of a fascinating part of the human body because
how many of you out there have either had or know someone who’s had Carpal Tunnel Syndrome? A rotator cuff tear? A shoulder dislocation or a fracture or dislocation of some bone
in the upper limb? We’re going to explore the normal musculoskeletal anatomy of the
upper limb and extend our conversation to talk about the causes of those common injuries
that occur in everyday life. This course will begin with an introduction to the parts of
the upper limb and a discussion of the anatomic positioning, including the planes in which
upper limb movements are performed. Next, we cover the osteology, the bones that make
up the upper limb, describing how they articulate at synovial joints and the movements that
are possible at these joints. Then we will look at the muscles that act at upper limb
joints that allow you to do things such as shrug your shoulders or flex your forearm
or make a fist or turn the palm of your hand so it faces posteriorly or when it’s facing
forward. Then we’ll extend our conversation to talk about how the upper limb gets its
innervation and its blood supply, and then we’ll move on to talk about about the pathologies
that result in Carpal Tunnel Syndrome and other common upper limb injuries. Then we’ll
finish up our conversation by talking about some other pathologies that are commonly seen
in this part of the human body. We hope you all will join us for Going Out on a Limb,
The Anatomy of the Upper Limb.

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