Muscles That Move the Foot and Toes

Muscles That Move the Foot and Toes


– [Voiceover] The muscles
that move the foot and toes. We’re going to start with
the tibialis anterior. This muscle right here is
your tibialis anterior. It’s right next to the tibia. The tibialis anterior, the
origin is the lateral condyle. And the upper two-thirds
of the tibial shaft. And a little bit comes off
of the interosseous membrane. It’s going to insert down
into the medial cuneiform. And the first metatarsal. Its action, dorsiflexion. The innervation is the deep fibular nerve. Our next muscle up is the extensor hallucis longus. The extensor hallucis longus is this muscle right here. It’s a little bit deeper. We can see a little bit
peeking out down here. Extensor hallucis longus. The action, like the
name hallucis implies, is it extends the great
toe, or extends the big toe. Extensor hallucis longus. Extensor digitorum longus will be this muscle right here. Extensor digitorum longus. Notice the tendons run right down into the individual toes. Your extensor digitorum longus has the action of toe extension. Looking at toes two through five. The next muscles are
the fibularis grouping. They’re going to be out
here on the lateral surface. Now you can’t really see
them from this angle, so we’ll have to rotate a little bit. Now that we’ve rotated the lower leg, you’re looking at the lateral aspect here. This muscle right here
is the fibularis longus. With this long tendon running down. The origin of the fibularis
longus is the head and upper portion of the lateral fibula. It inserts under the foot
to the first metatarsal and medial cuneiform. You can see how it comes down and inserts around down the foot. Its action is plantar flexion and eversion of the foot. Innervation is the
superficial fibular nerve. Now just deep to it is
the fibularis brevis. Can see some fibers right here. And some more fibers here. It’s what is deeper under the tendon of the fibularis longus. Fibularis brevis. The action of the fibularis brevis is plantar flexing and
everting the foot, again. So both fibularis longus
and fibularis brevis share the same actions. The next two muscles are part of the calf. We have to look at the posterior side. Which means we need to
rotate the leg again. The more external muscle is
the gastrocnemius muscle. You can see how it has two
muscle bellies right here. The gastrocnemius. The origin of the gastrocnemius comes from the medial and lateral
condyles of the femur. Originating up here from the femur. It’s going to insert via
the calcaneal tendon. This the calcaneal tendon,
down to the calcaneus. Its action is plantar flexion of the foot. Plantar flexion of the foot. Its innervation is the tibial nerve. So innervation is the tibial nerve. Now, just below it, so we’re talking deep to the gastrocnemius, going to have to remove this one muscle
belly to see part of it. The muscle you now see below it, with that gastrocnemius removed. This is the soleus muscle. The soleus muscle is
going to have an origin of the superior tibia, the fibula, as well as the interosseous membrane. The insertion, same as gastrocnemius. Calcaneal tendon, inserting
into the calcaneus. The action again is
plantar flexes the foot. Innervation again is the tibial nerve. Now for the next muscles, we had to remove the gastrocnemius and soleus. So we’re still on the posterior
aspect of the lower leg, but now gastrocnemius and soleus are gone. The first muscle we’ll cover down here is the popliteus muscle, right here. Popliteus. The popliteus muscle will have the action of flexing and rotating the leg medially. To unlock the extended
knee when flexion begins. That’s a mouthful. So think about it, if you had your legs perfectly straight, your knee is locked. As your knee is going to start to flex. You’re going to basically bend your knee. That initial bending is
the flexion of popliteus as you first start flexion of the knee. That’s popliteus. The next muscle back here is going to be flexor hallucis longus. It’s more towards the lateral side of the posterior portion of the lower leg. The flexor hallucis longus will have the action of plantar flexion
and inversion of the foot. The next muscle is
flexor digitorum longus. This one’s on the medial
aspect of the posterior leg. This is flexor digitorum longus. The origin of flexor digitorum longus is the posterior tibia. The insertion is the distal phalanges two through five. Now the action is plantar flexes the foot as well as inverts the foot. So it turns the soles of the foot inward. The innervation is the tibial nerve. Which leaves us with a third muscle on the posterior portion of the lower leg. That is the tibialis posterior. This is the tibialis posterior. It’s found right in between the flexor hallucis longus and the flexor digitorum longus. Now the tibialis posterior has an origin of the superior tibia
and the superior fibula. As well as some from the
interosseous membrane. Its insertion is going all the way down into several of the
tarsals and metatarsals two through four. Its action, foot inversion. Turn the foot towards themselves. Foot inversion. And the innervation is the tibial nerve.

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