Vastus Lateralis Self-administered Dynamic Release a.k.a. Pin and Stretch

Vastus Lateralis Self-administered Dynamic Release a.k.a. Pin and Stretch


This is Brent of the Brookbush Institute, and
in this video we’re going over more advanced self-administered release
techniques. In this particular video we’re going to go over vastus lateralis
pin and stretch, or vastus lateralis active release. I’m going to have my
friend Melissa come out, she’s going to help me demonstrate. Now what Melissa is
going to do is she’s going to take one of these trigger point rollers here, and
she’s going to roll up and down her vastus lateralis, which is the area on
the side of her thigh from her greater trochanter. That big bump just lateral to
your hip all the way down to your knee. Can you find the most tender point? Yeah all right, go ahead and get down on
your elbow, make sure that your kind of straightened out here, and people have
a tendency to turn into little cashews on this technique. Make sure that
their form is still pretty good. Now if this was a static release technique
she’d be done. She would have found the tender spot, she’s in good form
we would just wait for that release technique to diminish in tenderness.
And I’m going to assume that if you’re watching this video you’ve already done
that static technique, but now we’re going to move on, we’re going to progress.
So I’m going to have her roll up just a little bit this way. This is going to
move that foam roll from on the trigger point. Which we’re also going to assume
is the adhesive point, to just distal that adhesive point. And now the fun part, I’m
going to have Melissa flex her knee. And what’s that literally is doing, is
it’s taking her muscle fibers and shearing them past the tissue that’s
being blocked by the foam roll. So we’re actually getting some fascial shear here,
which we’re hoping is breaking up some of this adhesive tissue and improving
extensibility. Now the protocol for this is very similar to active stretching. She
can do 2-5 second holds at the top here, and we’re going to do 10 to 15
repetitions. Once you’ve done 10 to 15 repetitions she can go ahead and move on
to the other side, or potentially move on to another adhesive point within the
same muscle. Now if I wanted to progress this even further I can’t just go to a
smaller object, you guys have seen other videos where I’ve done static release
techniques with a medicine ball or a softball. We do want to decrease surface
area, but we can’t decrease surface area in width. If we decrease this way, there’s
a chance that that adhesive tissue that we were trying to block with the trigger
point roll here, would then become well, not a block, the adhesive tissue would
just kind of go around something like a softball. So we need something that’s
smaller in diameter this way, but not this way, and that’s where this guy comes
in. This is a quad baller from trigger point, and as you guys can see it’s it’s
a dowel wrapped with some padding. It’s pretty tough, pretty small surface area,
but it still has that width we need to make sure we block that adhesive tissue. Melissa is going to demonstrate and
wince as she does this. Make sure you guys aren’t throwing this at clients,
first time clients, people who’ve never foam rolled before. These are advanced
techniques. They do tend to be quite a bit more tender than the static release
techniques with like a soft foam roll. You found it, good. Once she’s found that spot,
once again we’re gonna go just distal to that spot. So she’s got to roll up just a
little bit, make sure she’s just off the point and she’s right here. So she’s
braced up against that adhesive tissue, and then she can go ahead and flex her
knee 10 to 15 times, 2 to 5 second holds, nice slow tempo. A good point to make
here guys is with all foam roll and self-administered release techniques, the
role or object doesn’t move, you might for these active release techniques, and
static release techniques nothing moves. But it’s not the foam roll that
rolls up and down, or the quad baller that rolls up and down, and the trigger
point roller that rolls up and down. that’s probably not going to do much to
increase our extensibility. There’s really no good model to show that that
would affect tissues in a way that would be beneficial. This on the other hand,
shearing fascial tissue that has the potential to increase extensibility,
increase performance by reducing restrictions. Things that could be
leaking some of the potential performance we already have. I hope you
guys enjoy this technique as much as you can. It is fairly aggressive. You need to
be careful who you give this to, but for an advanced athlete like Melissa here,
where we’re trying to get every ounce out of her performance, definitely worth
a shot. I look forward to hearing from you guys on the outcomes you got from
this technique. Thank you.

25 Replies to “Vastus Lateralis Self-administered Dynamic Release a.k.a. Pin and Stretch”

  1. Once again great video Brent . OK now we have our corrective exercise program (Release, Stretch, Isolated Activation, Subsystem Integration). How long does it take to see some results (e.x less pain, better joint mobility etc) regarding this exercise routine ? Can this exercise protocol eliminate the compensations (e.x upper crossed syndrome, anterior pelvic tilt etc.) ? If not how much say in percentage can improve any problem -compensation ? Sorry if there are a lot of questions Brent.

    Thank you

  2. Really clear, informative videos. Thanks for the help! I find this muscle gets very tight from my jump teaining. Are there any other specific areas you would recommend working on releasing for jump specific training?

  3. Hi DrB!
    Is it possible for this Vastula muscle to shorten with valgus or knock knees?

    I'm 26 and had knock/called knees due to flat feet with an inward tilt. I have custom inserts now that help distribute weight properly.

    Yet, when I stretch my lower half, such as lunges, the sides of my legs feel like they're on fire. They are rock hard. I have issues from my legs up to my neck. Muscle tightness, burning, pain, number skin from spinal issues and pinched nerves, etc. Can all of this be caused by the knee issues?

    My theory is that these muscles have been compromised and not used properly for so long that they are stiff and short. Is this true? Also, any suggestions to assist with this?

  4. Hi DrB!
    Is it possible for this Vastula muscle to shorten with valgus or knock knees?

    I'm 26 and had knock/called knees due to flat feet with an inward tilt. I have custom inserts now that help distribute weight properly.

    Yet, when I stretch my lower half, such as lunges, the sides of my legs feel like they're on fire. They are rock hard. I have issues from my legs up to my neck. Muscle tightness, burning, pain, number skin from spinal issues and pinched nerves, etc. Can all of this be caused by the knee issues?

    My theory is that these muscles have been compromised and not used properly for so long that they are stiff and short. Is this true? Also, any suggestions to assist with this?

  5. would you recommend this to someone who is suffering from the vastus lateralis pulling the patella to the outside of the knee?

  6. LOL, the first time you told her to start flexing her knee my eyes just watered because i could imagine the pain and the feeling i would have in my knee XD

  7. Hello Doc.
    I really appreciate this video and the other one about the rectus femoris dymamic release. I have just one question to remove one doubt. My tender spot is in a "middle" position. I mean, my body is not completely in a vertical position (like in this video) or in an horizontal position (like in the rectus femoris video) to reach the spot that hurts me. In my case, could I identify the release like a rectus femoris or a vastus laterali release? I ask because I have the doubt that I cannot stay in a middle position and I'm wronging the release exercise.
    Best regards,
    Fabio.
    P.s. I looked a lot of your videos, all interesting!

  8. Had surgery on my Vastus Lateralis and it has been stuck "Locked"… I have been going to PT but it still won't allow my knee to bend more than 50%. Have any ideas? Thank you

  9. 🙌🏾🙌🏾🙌🏾🙌🏾🙌🏾🙌🏾🙌🏾

  10. When bending your knee, should you feel any discomfort? Cause when I do it my knee hurts, but after 20 minutes my knee feels better

  11. I suffered(still some) from hip bursitis. Can stifness in the vastus lateralis be related and thus recommended to be released with the static version and then progress to the active release technique? I hope you answer but otherwise, I stay happy just to have your content available 😊

  12. For quite some time I have had this type of pain in my left outer quad. It tends to tighten the outside and up around the hip and makes sleeping discomforting. Today I told my LMT, who, then worked the area with dedication. I was quite sore, but not in pain. It has never given me trouble while in physical activity, occasionally while sitting though. However, today on my drive away, I noticed exactly what I was doing that made it flair up. Clutch pedal! For me it was a taken for granted motion. One of those seemingly innocuous motions, repeated,,,,time after time. Just a slight extension of the leg. It made sense to me now.. Is this a ballpark idea of what could be going on? Great video!

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