What is the pelvic floor? | The Pelvic Floor | Kegel8

What is the pelvic floor? | The Pelvic Floor | Kegel8


So, what is the pelvic floor? What does it
do? Well the pelvic floor is a really big, very important, muscle in the body. But its
the one you can’t see. So I brought a model along to show you. Because I think its the
hardest thing to get your head round – what it does and where it is. So this is the pelvis.
So same way round as you, same way round as me. And I’m going to take the pelvic floor
out for the moment to show you the bone part. So if we look at the pelvis from all the angles,
its hips here, spine going up the back, pubic bone at the front, nothing through the bottom
– there’s a hole. You’ve got to have the hole so we can wee and we can empty our bowels and if
you want to have babies. But men’s are the same shape, even though they don’t have babies.
But if all we had under here was skin, our insides would be able to just fall through and
sag against the skin during the day. So we have to have something really good under here
to stop things falling through, and that’s this muscle group. So this is the pelvic floor,
its a group of muscles and together they make this big bowl shape. Same size as two hands,
and coming up round the edges. And that will sit in the bottom of the pelvis, connecting
up to your tail bone, and your pubic bone, and your sitting bones. And it makes the floor.
So if this was a box, the walls are made of bone but the bottom is made of muscle. And
up here we have the diaphragm reflecting the pelvic floor so from our lungs up here and
then lots of intestines in here and into this space has to go your bladder, this is my little
bladder shape, sits behind the pubic bone, and then it has its tube coming out the front,
the urethra. And I’ll show you that just bit more detail in a moment. And then you’ve got
to get in there your bowel, and your uterus and ovaries, and then all your intestines.
But if its working well, nothing falls through. Its all supported, but to do that job, this
muscle has to be firm. So it has to be like a good arm muscle, it can’t get soft and floppy.
Because if it gets soft and floppy, everything is going to move around, things can sink,
which we call pelvic organ prolapse, and if the bladders shaking then leaks can escape.
So I like to think of it having four jobs. Job number one is to be a support, and it
has to be a support all day, no matter what you are doing. So if you are carrying a toddler
at play group. Or your bags of shopping, its got to hold everything in. And then its second
job is that if you want to cough, or sneeze, or laugh, or jump there is going to be a shake
of the bladder, and it has to help to tighten up extra to stop leakage through the tube.
Its third job is that if the bladder wants a wee, and its going “I want to wee, I want
to wee”. Its your pelvic floor muscles underneath that are arguing back and going “no not right
now. Its got to hang on.” And then the fourth thing is has to be able to do is it has to
be able to relax and release and stretch out. Because when you want to empty your bowel
or empty your bladder, and for sex, its got to be able to let go and have some space and
allow things to open. And we can go through all those in a bit more detail.

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