Where Do You Get Your PROTEIN On A Vegan Diet? | Dr Michael Greger of Nutritionfacts.org

Where Do You Get Your PROTEIN On A Vegan Diet? | Dr Michael Greger of Nutritionfacts.org


You’re vegan? Where do you get your Omega
3’s, Protein, Calcium, Protein, Iodine, Protein… Magnesium, Protein, Iron, Protein, Zinc… …Vitamin D, Protein, B12, Protein Protein?…Let’s, ask a doctor. Protein. Hi it’s Emily from Bite Size Vegan and welcome
to another vegan nugget. I’m excited to bring to you the first video in a new series
covering all the major nutrients of concern on a vegan diet, with the incredible Dr. Michael
Greger of Nutritionfacts.org If you’re not familiar with Dr. Greger, he’s a medical
doctor, author, and internationally recognized speaker on nutrition, food safety, and public
health issues. He’s a licensed general practitioner specializing in clinical nutrition. He provides
the invaluable public service of nutritionfact.org, a totally free website and repository of videos
and articles on the most current issues in the field of nutrition. And, since he provides these free updates
as his site says, “via bite-sized videos,” I’m obviously a fan. So I wanted to be able
to provide new vegans, the vegan curious, and even established vegans with a series
of videos addressing the most common nutritional worries surrounding a vegan diet. And we’re
starting with the one every vegan hears more times than we can count: Protein. Well, thank you so much Dr. Greger
for giving us some of your very valuable time to sit here and tell us a little bit about
how to ensure that you get proper nutrition when you’re going onto a vegan diet. Happy to help! Alright so…I thought we start with
the one that’s like the most controversial nutrient when you’re talking about…eating
a vegan diet, and that is protein. So, I was wondering if you could talk a little about
how it is that we get protein when we’re not eating animal products. Yeah, surprising there’s so
much fuss and the average requirement is about 42 grams. And, meat eaters get about 75 grams,
and so do vegans, and so do vegetarians. Everybody gets about 70% more protein than they need.
They only need about…0.8 grams per kilogram, healthy body weight. The only people really…so
about 3% of people in the nation, in a study of about 13,000 people…a survey that the
government does every few years. About 3% are not getting enough protein, but that’s
just because they’re typically not eating a lot. If you don’t eat enough food, you
don’t eat enough protein. So, if you’re on a severely calorie restricted diet, you
have to be more careful about nutrients. But you know, the ironic thing is there actually
is a nutrient for which 97% aren’t sufficient, but actually deficient and that’s fiber.
And the question isn’t, ‘where do you get your protein?’, the question should
be ‘where do you get your fiber?’, because fiber is the one that 97% don’t even reach
the recommended daily minimum. And that’s the one that actually has consequences, and
tied to, you know, getting sufficient amounts, lower rates of cancer and heart disease, and
diabetes, and obesity, and hypertension. And so, I mean, these are the nutrients we have
to think about getting enough of, living basically anywhere in the industrialized world. And would you say that there’s more,
of at least, with people who are getting sufficient calories…would you think there’s more
of a worry of almost getting too much protein, rather than too little, like when we’re
eating animal products? You just need to get…it’s
the source that matters, alright. So, when we’re talking about carbs, or fat, or protein,
it’s really the source, right. Carbs are lentils and lollipops, right, protein…you
know, fat can be crisco and lard, or it can be walnuts. I mean you gotta…you know they just can’t care about the source. So, we got whole food sources
of nutrition, and you don’t have to worry about these things. So, where do you get protein
from? The protein super stars of the plant kingdom are the legumes, right…beans, peas,
you know, chickpeas, split peas, lentils. I mean, that’s what we should all be including
legumes in our daily diet that are packed with all sorts of wonderful things, you know
so…get proteins from whole grains and nuts, and seeds, and things. But, I encourage people
to eat legumes everyday because they’re so powerful in supporting healthy long life. I think, that you know, obviously the
protein one is what everyone focuses on and just like you said, its very much a non-issue
which is…it’s kind of interesting when you really break it down, and show people
that there’s really no concern. I’ve told people before, if you’re eating enough calories
there’s no way that you’re not getting enough protein, so. Unless you’re eating junk food,
I mean, so there’s no protein in cotton candy. Alright so, you can eat a strictly
vegan, sufficient calorie diet that’s completely lacking protein if you just ate hard candy
all day. So, it’s important, you know, to be a healthy, you know…plant based eater,
we have to actually eat our plants. Absolutely yes, anything naturally
made is going to have it in there. I hope you enjoyed hearing from Dr. Greger
on the issue of protein in a vegan diet. Links to his site and channel are in the video description below.
If you want to see my personal protein numbers after a day of consuming some series plant matter,
check out one of these two videos. I even show you the breakdown of my nutritional intake. Now I’ve had more inquiries than I can count
about what software I used on those videos to track my nutrients. It’s a fantastic
free service called Cronometer. If you want to go vegan and have sound nutrition, Cronometer
is a great way to stay on track. And, as an example of just how awesome they are,
they’re sponsoring this video to help get this important information out to potential
and current vegans. So, be sure to use the link in the video description to go show the
people at Cronometer some love. It’s not an affiliate link, so I’m not gonna get any money
when you click on it, but it will let Cronometer know that I sent you, so they know the Bite
Size Vegan audience is awesomely engaged [ding] And one thing I really want you to remember in all of this, a vegan diet can be as varied
as you want and can come in countless forms. So if the way that I eat or any individual
eats doesn’t work for you, don’t swear off being vegan. You can eat any type
of cuisine under the sun in a vegan version. Even monolithic masterpieces like this. So I’d love to hear from you on this- where
do you get your protein? Seriously. Where do you? If you’re a vegan, how do you answer
that question? If you’re not vegan but thinking about making your way there, is protein a concern
for you? Let me know in the comments! If you found this video helpful, give it a big thumbs
up and share it around to bust the protein myth. To help support Bite Size Vegan and
keep the education coming, check out either of the support links in the video description
below or, to get perks and rewards for helping out, join us in the Nugget Army on Patreon
by clicking that logo right there or the link in the video description below. If you’re new here, be sure to hit that big
red subscribe button down there for more awesome vegan content every Monday, Wednesday, and some
Fridays. I would love to have you as a member of the Bite Size family. And hey, while you’re
here, check out some of my related videos. And stay tuned for the rest of the series
with Dr. Greger. And all the links to all of these and anything I’ve mentioned in
this video are in the video description below for those of you who are on a phone or tablet
and can’t click ‘em. Now go live vegan, get your protein, and I’ll see you soon. Protein Protein Protein Protein Subtitles by the Amara.org community

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